AN EVIDENCE-BASED MODEL (COMPASSION AND VALUES INCLUDED)

Learn the basics of Collaborative and Proactive Solutions

STEP 1: CHANGE YOUR LENSES

Step one begins with a close look at your beliefs about why and when a child exhibits concerning behavior. Thanks to an enormous amount of research that’s been conducted over the past 50 years, we’ve learned that what we’ve been saying about kids with concerning behaviors (and what doing to them) has often been counterproductive and ineffective. Concerning behavior is not the result of poor parenting, faulty learning, or poor motivation. In this section, you’ll be asked to try on some new lenses so that you have a more accurate, compassionate understanding of a child’s concerning behavior. Watch the videos below to complete step one.

 

Solving Problems Rather Than Modifying Behavior

Solving Problems Collaboratively Rather Than Unilaterally

Let’s Get You Out of the Heat of the Moment

Kids Do Well if They Can

STEP 2: IDENTIFY LAGGING SKILLS AND UNSOLVED PROBLEMS

Step two involves the hard work of identifying the skills that the child is lacking and the specific expectations the child is having difficulty meeting, called unsolved problems. This is accomplished by completing the Assessment of Lagging Skills and Unsolved Problems (ALSUP). Identifying lagging skills tends to be the easy part for most adults, while wording the unsolved problems can be harder. A lot of kids have quite a few unsolved problems. So once they’re identified, you’ll need to prioritize which ones you’ll be working on first, using the Problem Solving Plan.

The video below will guide you through the process of completing the ALSUP. The ALSUP Guide, also below, will help too, as will the video showing an actual ALSUP meeting at a school.

Video: How to complete the ALSUP2020

Sample ALSUP Meeting at School

STEP 3: SOLVE PROBLEMS COLLABORATIVELY AND PROACTIVELY

Once you’ve identified and prioritized the child’s unsolved problems, it’s time to start solving those problems proactively. In this section, you’ll learn how to do that. Watch the videos below to see examples of Plan B between caregivers and kids of varying ages (more video examples are forthcoming).

The Three Plans and the Three Steps of Plan B

Demonstration of Plan B with a 10-year old Boy and His Parents

Demonstration of Plan B with a 15-year old Girl and Her Mom

Plan with a Mom and Her 15-Year Old Son

Full-Class Plan B